Full-Fat Milk Products Linked to Lower Diabetes Risk Compared to Low-Fat Products: Research

If you think that skimmed milk is better for your health than whole milk, then you may think again as a new study has challenged popular belief about low-fat dairy products helping in maintaining a healthy weight. Two new studies have found people consuming full-fat dairy products having a lower risk of diabetes and lower weight compared to individuals consuming low-fat milk products.

While the study teams haven’t evaluated the reasons behind the lower risk of diabetes for individuals consuming full-fat milk, they believe that it could be due to lower consumption. People consuming low-fat dairy products might actually be consuming products in higher quantity, the study team added. The Findings of the two latest studies suggest that whole milk or full-fat dairy products are healthier as compared to low-fat dairy products.

Researchers have discovered that consumption of whole milk products can possibly decrease the chances of suffering from obesity and diabetes.

During the study period of 15 years, the researchers noticed that the ones who consumed whole milk or full-fat dairy products suffered at least 46% lesser risk of developing diabetes during the study as compared to the ones who consumed low-fat milk or low-fat yogurt regularly.

The findings of the research are based on analysis of blood tests of the participants which had biomarkers of full-fat dairy intake.

The second study focused on the same subject analyzed over 18,000 middle-aged women who took part in the Women’s Health Study. The participants of the study had normal weight and didn’t have any cardiovascular diseases, pre-diabetes or diabetes in the starting of the research.

When the study period ended, the researchers observed that women who consumed high-fat dairy products developed at least 8% lesser chances of turning obese over the passage of time in comparison to the women who consumed less. The research didn’t show any link to low-fat dairy products.

While talking about the study findings, the author of the study and research fellow at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, Susanne Rautiainen said, “We saw less weight gain for higher total dairy and high-fat dairy intake and also a lower risk of becoming overweight and obese in those who consumed more high-fat dairy”.

While talking about the study findings, the author of the study and research fellow at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, Susanne Rautiainen said, “We saw less weight gain for higher total dairy and high-fat dairy intake and also a lower risk of becoming overweight and obese in those who consumed more high-fat dairy”.

But two new studies show it may be time to reconsider our options as scientists determine those of us who choose full-fat milk tend to weigh less than those who drink trim. They also revealed those who drink full fat are 46 percent less likely to develop diabetes than trim milk fans.

According to a report in ParentHerald by Alexie Summer, “Non-fat food items are better options according to health experts; however, this isn’t always the case according to a new study. Supporting studies suggest that full-fat is healthier than its low-fat version.”

Time reports that a new study published in the journal Circulation has found evidence that full-fat dairy can actually reduce the risk for diabetes and can aid in weight loss. This calls into question the widely-accepted belief that low-fat milk, or skimmed milk, is good for the heart and weight-friendly. The new study has found no evidence to back up these claims.

In a report published by the CBS NEWS, “Can we go back to putting whole milk in our coffee and slurping down real ice cream? Two recent studies suggest eating full-fat dairy foods instead of their thinner tasting, low-fat or non-fat counterparts may help cut the risk for diabetes and obesity. But the research is still early, experts told CBS News.”

Tufts researchers report in the journal Circulation that people who consumed full-fat dairy products had as much as a 46 percent lower risk of developing diabetes over the course of the 15-year study compared with people who opted for skim milk, low-fat yogurt, and low-fat cheese. The research was based on an analysis of blood test results showing biomarkers of full-fat dairy consumption.

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