Eight additional confirmed cases of measles in Pinal County

The Arizona Department of Health Services and Pinal County Public Health Services District have given confirmation to eight additional measles cases that have spread from an outbreak at the Eloy’s private detention center. With this, the toll of confirmed cases has reached to 10.

The facility has put in efforts to halt further spread in the detention center. A community-wide health alert has been issued by public health for Pinal County because one of the new cases has been to many sites across Casa Grande in the time period between May 15 and May 22.

Dr. Cara Christ, director of the Arizona Department of Health Services, said, “It’s extremely important that people who have rash and fever call health care provider or emergency department ahead of time to let them know they may have measles. This will help stop spread of measles, especially to those facing more risk of complications”.

The starting symptoms of the illness include fever of 101 degrees Fahrenheit or higher, watery red-colored eyes, runny nose and cough. After several days a red rash, raised, and blotchy becomes visible. The beginning of the rash starts on the head at the hairline and moves in the downward direction over the body.

In case you have any doubts of contracting measles, immediately contact your health care provider by phone and tell him about the symptoms. The doctor will tell you the appropriate time to visit him so as not to make others affected in the waiting area.

If you don’t have a health care provider, do visit a local hospital emergency room/urgent care center. Do contact them and tell them that you may have measles prior to paying a visit to their office so that they can take the essential precautions.

A report published in Tucson News Now revealed, “The Arizona Department of Health Services and Pinal County Public Health Services District have confirmed eight additional cases of measles stemming from an outbreak at the private detention center in Eloy. This brings the total number of confirmed cases to 10.”

“It’s extremely important that people who have a rash and fever call their health care provider or emergency department ahead of time to let them know they may have measles,” said Dr. Cara Christ, director of the Arizona Department of Health Services. “This will help stop the spread of measles, especially to those who are more at risk of developing complications.”

The illness begins with symptoms which include fever (101 degrees Fahrenheit or higher), red, watery eyes, cough and runny nose. A rash that is red, raised, and blotchy appears after several days. The rash begins on the head at the hairline and moves down the body.

“In a news release, the health department said that shoppers and employees of the Maysville Road Kohl’s and Walmart who were at those stores on May 20 from 1-5 p.m. could have been exposed to the virus. The health department said those individuals should monitor themselves for a symptoms until June 10 – primarily those who have not been vaccinated with the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine,” according to a news report published by NBC41.

The health department did not identify the patient stricken with the highly contagious virus, but said they are working closely and cooperatively with both local and state health officials in the investigation. Officials said May 20 was the only day of exposure.

Measles is a highly contagious virus and spreads through the air through coughing and sneezing. Symptoms of measles generally appear about 7-14 days after a person is infected, but can occur up to 21 days after exposure, typically beginning with high fever, cough, runny nose, and red, watery eyes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Two or 3 days after symptoms begin, tiny white spots may appear inside the mouth, and 3-5 days after symptoms begin, a rash breaks out. It usually begins as flat red spots that appear on the face at the hairline and spread downward to the neck, trunk, arms, legs, and feet. When the rash appears, a person’s fever may spike to more than 104 degrees Fahrenheit. After a few days, the fever subsides and the rash fades.

According to a report in Azcentral by Sydney Greene, “Officials warned the public to be aware of symptoms, such as a fever of 101 degrees or higher, red and watery eyes, a cough, runny nose and a rash that is red, raised and blotchy. The rash starts on the face at the hairline and moves down the body. Symptoms typically appear seven to 12 days after exposure, but can take up to 21 days.”

“It’s extremely important that people who have a rash and fever call their healthcare provider or emergency department ahead of time to let them know they may have measles,” said Dr. Cara Christ, director of the Arizona Department of Health Services, in a news release. “This will help stop the spread of measles, especially to those who are more at risk of developing complications.”

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