Kiss Kills 20-Year-Old Girl and Mother Warns about allergic reactions

Mother of Myriam Ducre-Lemay, who died when she was only 20 years old, revealed the mystery behind her death in 2012. Ducre-Lemay died subsequent to kissing her boyfriend. How much it sounds weird, but what they both did not realize was that her boyfriend had consumed a peanut butter sandwich and he was not aware of the fact that Ducre-Lemay was allergic to it.

Not realizing the severity of the allergy and also Ducre-Lemay not carrying her EpiPen at that time, they both kissed, which proved fatal for the girl. Myriam’s mother is now making this story public so that others can be prevented from such a disastrous situation. Ducre-Lemay and her boyfriend were out for a party earlier during that night and that is why she was not carrying her medication or her Medic Alert bracelet.

She used her asthma pump after experiencing trouble in breathing as she kissed her boyfriend. However, the asthma pump did not prove to be helpful. On enquiring about eating peanut butter from her boyfriend, who confirmed of having it, she told him to immediately call 911. Her boyfriend did try to give her CPR prior to the arrival of ambulance.

The emergency crews used epinephrine in an attempt to revive her but were unsuccessful. On way to hospital, Ducre-Lemay had a cardiopulmonary arrest, resulting in cerebral anoxia, in which the brain does not get enough oxygen. After being taken off the respirator, Ducre-Lemay died.

Dr. Christine McCusker, the Head of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology at Montreal Children’s Hospital, explained that people of 15-30 years of age are most susceptible to extreme allergic reactions and, therefore, it is necessary for them to carry EpiPen all the time. “People don’t necessarily recognize it can go from that point where, ‘I feel funny’ to ‘Uh oh’ very fast”, said Dr. McCusker.

“Canadian woman Myriam Ducré-Lemay, 20, had been at a party in Montreal with her new boyfriend in October 2012. They went back to his place, but he – having zero idea about her severe nut allergy – ate a peanut butter sandwich, brushed his teeth and kissed her,” according to a news report published by Sport Act.

Within minutes, Myriam was suffering shortness of breath. She tried her asthma inhaler, but when that didn’t work, asked her boyfriend if he’d eaten nuts. And unfortunately, despite him calling 911 and an ambulance arriving eight minutes later, Myriam later died from severe cerebral anoxia, where the brain is deprived of oxygen.

“We must insist on the bracelet,” said Micheline, who said that her daughter usually carried her EpiPen with her, and that everyone – except her new boyfriend – knew about her situation. “If she had had the Medic-Alert bracelet, her boyfriend would have seen it before.”

According to a report in Cosmopolitan by Tess Koman, “Myriam Ducre-Lemay, 20, died in 2012 after kissing her boyfriend — he’d eaten a peanut butter sandwich and wasn’t aware of her peanut allergy (or the severity of it) and she was not carrying her EpiPen with her at the time, CTV News reports. Her mother is just now publicizing the story to help others avoid the same situation.”

According to CJAD, Ducre-Lemay and her boyfriend had been out at a party earlier that night, which is why she didn’t have her medication or her Medic Alert bracelet on her. After the kiss, she had trouble breathing, tried using her asthma pump, and, when that didn’t work, asked her boyfriend about peanuts — when he said he’d eaten them, she told him to call 911.

Head of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology at Montreal Children’s Hospital Dr. Christine McCusker told CTV people between the ages 15 to 30 are in the “risk age range” and are most likely to suffer from severe allergic reactions. This is why people with allergies carry “EpiPen[s], even though you don’t want to and even though it’s not cool,” McCuskey said. “People don’t necessarily recognize it can go from that point where, ‘I feel funny’ to ‘Uh oh’ very fast.”

A report published in AOL informed, “Myriam Ducre-Lemay, 20, died in 2012 after kissing her boyfriend, after he ate a peanut butter sandwich earlier that day. He reportedly didn’t know she was severely allergic to peanuts. Shortly after the two smooched Ducre-Lemay had trouble breathing so she reached for asthma pump, according to Cosmopolitan.”

People between the ages 15 to 30 are in the “risk age range” and are more likely to have severe allergic reactions, according to head of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology at Montreal Children’s Hospital Dr. Christine McCusker.

Ducre-Lemay didn’t have her Epipen with her that evening, which doctors said could’ve stopped the situation from escalating so quickly.

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