SpaceX’s CRS-9 mission is scheduled to launch on July 16

The next mission of SpaceX is heading into the business end of its pre-launch flow with the involvement of the next Falcon 9 in a Static Fire test at Cape Canaveral’s SLC-40.

The SpaceX officials have to conduct the dual launch of the Eutelsat 117W B and ABS 2A satellites ‘No Earlier Than (NET)’ June 15. The company is also working for the historic re-flight of a recovered Falcon 9 first stage in Autumn.

For the company, the dual satellite launch Eutelsat 117W B and ABS 2A is going to mark the completion of a hectic round of successful commercial satellite missions.

After this launch, the SpaceX is planning to take rest for a month prior to a mid-July mission, including the latest Dragon mission’s launch to the International Space Station (ISS). On July 16, the CRS-9 mission is planned for a launch.

The next mission of the company has come only some weeks after the Thaicom 8 satellite’s successful lofting.

An obvious indication of the company’s schedule intent was the view of the next Falcon 9 booster reaching at the launch area within hours of the launch of Thaicom 8.

Before Florida’s road trip, the stage had successfully accomplished its testing flow at the SpaceX test area in McGregor, Texas.

Though the Texas testing involved the firing of the nine Merlin 1D engines of the stage, a main milestone verifying that the rocket was all set for its launch day was the Static Fire test at Cape Canaveral’s SLC-40.

There are many needs that have to be proven successfully through the test, like the engine ignition and closure commands, which need to work as designed, and that the Merlin 1D engines work aptly at the time of start-up.

According to a story published on the topic by Space, “The private spaceflight company SpaceX plans to relaunch one of its Falcon 9 boosters into orbit this fall — a test flight that will mark the next giant leap in the firm’s pursuit of reusable rocket technology.”

SpaceX has four successful rocket landings under its belt, including three back-to-back touchdowns at sea this spring, the most recent of which launched and landed on May 27. That latest Falcon 9 booster returned to Cape Canaveral, Florida (its launch site) on June 2 atop SpaceX’s drone ship landing pad “Of Course I Still Love You.” It was ultimately moved to a SpaceX hangar at Pad 39A of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center earlier this week.

Successfully launching and landing a Falcon 9 rocket that has already flown in space is a major goal for SpaceX’s reusable rocket program. The first stage of SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket is equipped with landing legs, control vanes and other technology that allow the boosters to return to Earth and land on a ground-based pad (which occurred in December 2015) or on a drone ship in the ocean (as in the three other successful landings).

“SpaceX’s next mission is moving into the business end of its pre-launch flow with the next Falcon 9 involved with a Static Fire test at Cape Canaveral’s SLC-40. The SpaceX workhorse is tasked with the dual launch of the Eutelsat 117W B and ABS 2A satellites “No Earlier Than (NET)” June 15. SpaceX is also working towards the historic reflight of a recovered Falcon 9 first stage this Autumn,” according to a news report published by Nasa Spaceflight.

Following this launch, SpaceX will take a short break of around a month before a mid-July mission involving the launch of the latest Dragon mission to the International Space Station (ISS). The CRS-9 mission is scheduled to launch on July 16, pending the completion of flow milestones and the usual considerations relating to the Station’s Visiting Vehicle manifest.

A clear sign of SpaceX’s schedule intent was the sight of the next Falcon 9 booster arriving at the launch site within hours of the Thaicom 8 launch. Prior to the road trip to Florida, the stage had successfully completed its testing flow at the SpaceX test site in McGregor, Texas.

A report published in Seattle Times said, “In the next two weeks, the Hawthorne, Calif., space company will brief domestic and international insurance underwriters on its progress. As part of that regular annual review, they will discuss upgrades to the company’s Falcon 9 rockets, as well as its plans to reuse them.”

“It’s a matter of keeping the market educated on what’s going on,” said Poliseno, who will be attending the meetings with insurers. “Generally when you do that and demonstrate something works, they’ll be very supportive.”

The company lists its starting price for the Falcon 9 rocket at $62 million. The average price of a launch with United Launch Alliance, a joint venture of Boeing and Lockheed Martin that competes with SpaceX for national security satellite launch contracts, is $225?million.

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